CISP Online

Blog of the Centre for Invention & Social Process, Goldsmiths

October 14, 2019
by Emily Nicholls
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The Anthropocene & the Cell: On Sediments, Genomes and Reading the Biology of History

CISP Talk by Hannah Landecker

25th October 5-7pm

Professor Stuart Hall Building room 326

Hannah Landecker is a historian and sociologist of the life sciences. She holds a joint appointment in the life and social sciences at UCLA as professor in the department of sociology and director of the institute for society and genetics, an interdisciplinary unit committed to cultivating research and pedagogy at the interface of the life and human sciences. Landecker is the author of Culturing life: How cells became technologies (harvard up, 2007) and writes on biotechnology and the intersection of biology and film. Her recent work concerns antibiotic resistance, and the history and sociology of metabolism and epigenetics.… Continue reading

May 10, 2019
by Emily Nicholls
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Serres and Foundations

CISP talk by Professor Turo-Kimmo Lehtonen (Sociology, Tampere University)

30th May 4.30-6.30 pm

Richard Hoggart Building room 137a, Goldsmiths, University of London

Abstract
While Michel Serres’ work has become relatively well-known among social theoreticians in recent years, his explicit thematization of the foundations of human collectives has gained surprisingly little attention. This article claims that Serres’ approach to the theme of foundations can be clarified by scrutinizing the way in which he poses and answers the following three questions: How are we together? What and whom do we exclude from our togetherness and how? Who are we today? Instead of starting with a ready-made order, be it on the scale and form of individuals or society, Serres pushes social research to take up the challenge of examining the point at which order is about to emerge out of noise and chaos, but where the outcome of the process remains uncertain.… Continue reading

May 10, 2019
by Emily Nicholls
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Reflections From the Third CISP Salon: Human-Animal Relations

On 9th April, CISP Salon members met to discuss texts by Giraud & Hollin (2016) and Despret & Meuret (2016) in order to reflect on care in the context of human-animal relations. Below, Dr. Fay Dennis shares her thoughts on the session.

So far in the series, care has proved a productive and lively concept to think with that has taken us from historical forms of injustice and the possibilities of another science to the ethics of gay partying and queer politics, and this week, to human-animal relations. For me, one thing that has become clearer in light of these most recent discussions is the extent to which care – as a practice of knowing and doing – is always already politically, socially and materially entangled.… Continue reading

April 8, 2019
by Emily Nicholls
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Reflections From the Second CISP Salon (2018-2019)

On 26th February, CISP Salon members met to discuss texts by Kane Race and Karen Barad in order to reflect on what it might mean to queer care in our own practices as scholars of science and technology. Following the session, participants were invited to share an element of the discussion that they had found particularly interesting or provocative. Below, Bryan Lim and Adam Christianson share their thoughts on the session:

 

Bryan Lim:

The CISP salon asked us to reflect on Kane Race’s empirical account of “queer chemistry” and Barad’s invitation to take seriously the experimental nature of the world we inhabit, in the context of thinking through care critically.… Continue reading

March 12, 2019
by Emily Nicholls
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London Conference in Critical Thought

From the LCCT Collective: 

We are delighted that the 8th annual London Conference in Critical Thought (LCCT) will be hosted and supported this year by the Centre for Invention and Social Process (CISP) in the Department of Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London.

The LCCT is a free, inter-institutional, interdisciplinary conference in critical thought that takes place annually in different institutions across London. LCCT follows a non-hierarchical, decentralised model of organisation that undoes conventional academic distinctions between plenary lectures and break-out sessions, aiming instead to create opportunities for intellectual critical exchange regardless of participants’ disciplinary field, institutional affiliation, or seniority.… Continue reading